You’ve probably noticed that the prices for different services vary significantly. Anything between $30,000 to $500,000+ for an eCommerce website? Retainer contracts that cost anything between $30,000 to $160,000+ annually? Really?!

        While Salt Bae charges $1,000 for a Wagyu steak wrapped in edible 24-karat gold leaf, that’s hardly an indication for a range. You can’t say that a steak would cost you anything between $15 to $1,000. That’s definitely not true. So, what’s going on with those eCommerce agency rates?

There is a truth, universally acknowledged, that you can apply to pretty much anything- including the eCommerce agency you choose to work with. They can be fast, good, or cheap – but they can only be two. Retailers should be aware of the selection criteria they use when choosing an agency to work with for their online store and most importantly, their livelihood. While you want a good and cheap product fast, that’ll never be the case. If it’s good and cheap, it won’t be fast. If it’s fast and good, it won’t be cheap. You get it.

What We Offer

WHAT
DETERMINES
PRICE?

01

EXPERIENCE

Our team of in-house automotive and proven business growth experts have "covered the field" when it comes to representing brands corretly and efficiently. With over 30+ years of leading experience between our staff; We have what it takes.

03

ACCESS

While paying U.S. salaries adds to the overall cost, it gives you peace of mind that if your website goes down during your working hours, the team will step in and assist almost immediately. You also know you won’t be assigned a development resource that doesn’t speak the same language once you sign the contract and send the first payment.

02

LOCATION

Even though U.S.-based agencies are more expensive than overseas agencies, they’re the safest option. You’ll get to work with a team that’s in the same timezone and speaks your language (no locale/country-based restrictions and regulations to explain, zero corporate firewall issues to overcome).

04

RELIABILITY

You know that a contract with a Southern California based company is a real, legally-binding contract. There are just so many things that can—and probably will—go wrong with offshore agencies. If it gets bad (or worse), what is the legal recourse when working with a company that is headquartered in another country? Something to consider.

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Robb Walters